Dr. Giscombe and Associates, P.A.

2801 Blue Ridge Rd. Suite G10
Raleigh, NC 27607
info@blueridgedentalcare.com

(919) 781-3862

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Posts for: May, 2018

By Blue Ridge Dental Care
May 30, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

What you need to know about tooth colored fillings from your dentist in Raleigh

If you have damaged or decayed teeth, chances are you have been thinking about dental fillings. Does the idea of large, metal fillings stoptooth colored fillings you from getting necessary dental treatment? If so, you’ll be happy to know that you have a better choice, tooth colored fillings! Dr. Ajamu Giscombe at Blue Ridge Dental Care in Raleigh, NC, wants to share how tooth-colored fillings can restore your smile.

Tooth-colored fillings are versatile and can repair all of the same issues as conventional metal fillings, but provide a much more natural look. Consider tooth-colored fillings to repair teeth that are:

  • Eroded from dental decay
  • Worn down or chipped from bad habits or aging
  • Broken, damaged, or cracked from an accident or injury

Tooth-colored fillings can restore both the strength and beauty of your teeth. Tooth-colored fillings use a liquid resin material known as composite, instead of metal. Metal fillings tend to wedge a tooth apart, separating it into sections, making it more prone to breakage. Tooth-colored fillings work differently because the material is bonded to your tooth with strong cement, holding your tooth together, protecting it from breakage. That’s why tooth colored fillings actually make your teeth stronger.

Increased strength isn’t the only benefit of tooth-colored fillings. One of the main reasons people love tooth-colored fillings is because they are virtually invisible in your smile. The composite material can be matched perfectly to the color of your teeth. It can also be sculpted perfectly to accent the natural contours of your teeth. The end result is a harmonious, beautiful, natural-looking smile with no metal!

Treatment is easy and quick, requiring only one appointment. An etching material is applied which creates microscopic openings in the tooth surface to retain the composite. Then, a bonding cement is applied, and finally the composite. After the liquid composite has been sculpted perfectly, it is hardened using a dental light. That’s all there is to it!

If you need to restore your smile, consider tooth colored fillings! They are the modern solution to a strong, beautiful smile. For more information about tooth-colored fillings and other restorative and cosmetic dental services call Dr. Giscombe at Blue Ridge Dental Care in Raleigh, NC, today!


SealantsCouldProtectYourChildsTeethFromFutureProblems

Teeth lost to tooth decay can have devastating consequences for a child’s dental health. Not only can it disrupt their current nutrition, speech and social interaction, it can also skew their oral development for years to come.

Fortunately, we have a number of preventive tools to curb decay in young children. One of the most important of these, dental sealants, has been around for decades. We apply these resin or glass-like material coatings to the pits and crevices of teeth (especially molars) to help prevent the buildup of bacterial plaque in areas where bacteria tend to thrive.

Applying sealants is a simple and pain-free process. We first brush the coating in liquid form onto the teeth’s surface areas we wish to protect. We then use a special curing light to harden the sealant and create a durable seal.

So how effective are sealants in preventing tooth decay? Two studies in recent years reviewing dental care results from thousands of patients concluded sealants could effectively reduce cavities even four years after their application. Children who didn’t receive sealants had cavities at least three times the rate of those who did.

Sealant applications, of course, have some expense attached to them. However, it’s far less than the cost for cavity filling and other treatments for decay, not to mention future treatment costs resulting from previous decay. What’s more important, though, is the beneficial impact sealants can have a child’s dental health now and on into adulthood. That’s why sealants are recommended by both the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

And while sealants are effective, they’re only one part of a comprehensive strategy to promote your child’s optimum dental health. Daily brushing and flossing, a “tooth-friendly” diet and regular dental cleanings and checkups are also necessary in helping to keep your child’s teeth healthy and free of tooth decay.

If you would like more information on preventing tooth decay in children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Blue Ridge Dental Care
May 20, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental injuries  
KeepAheadofPotentialSidetrackstoYourChildsOralHealth

From birth to young adulthood, your child's teeth gums and other mouth structures steadily grow and mature. Sometimes, though, problems arise and get in the way of their oral health. It's important we detect when that happens and take action.

We can sort these potential problems into three broad categories: developmental, disease and injury. The first category includes such problems during their childhood years as teeth erupting out of position or the jaws growing improperly and becoming abnormally long, short, wide or narrow.

The possibility of developmental problems is a primary reason for regular dental visits, beginning around your child's first birthday. If we can detect a growing problem early, we may be able to minimize or even reverse its impact to your child's oral health.

Regular dental care also helps control disease, particularly tooth decay and cavity formation. Our primary aim is to treat decay, even in primary (baby) teeth: losing a primary tooth to decay could adversely affect the incoming permanent tooth's jaw position. Besides treatment, we can also help prevent decay with topical fluoride treatments (to strengthen enamel) and sealants.

Although not as common as disease, dental problems due to injury still occur all too frequently. Blows to the mouth can chip teeth, loosen them or even knock them out. For any type of visible tooth injury you should visit us or an emergency room immediately — time is of the essence especially to save a knocked out tooth. Be sure you recover and bring any knocked out teeth or chip fragments.

We can also help you on the injury prevention front as well. For example, if your child participates in contact sports or similar activities, we can fashion a custom-fitted mouth guard to protect their teeth and soft tissues.

Keeping a vigilant eye for these potential problems will help ensure your child's future oral health is the best it can be. The sooner these problems are detected, the better and less costly their outcome.

If you would like more information on caring for your child's teeth and gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


TakeStepstoTreatChronicMouthBreathingasEarlyasPossible

Many things can affect your child’s future dental health: oral hygiene, diet, or habits like thumb sucking or teeth grinding. But there’s one you might not have considered: how they breathe.

Specifically, we mean whether they breathe primarily through their mouth rather than through their nose. The latter could have an adverse impact on both oral and general health. If you’ve noticed your child snoring, their mouth falling open while awake and at rest, fatigue or irritability you should seek definite diagnosis and treatment.

Chronic mouth breathing can cause dry mouth, which in turn increases the risk of dental disease. It deprives the body of air filtration (which occurs with nose breathing) that reduces possible allergens. There’s also a reduction in nitric oxide production, stimulated by nose breathing, which benefits overall health.

Mouth breathing could also hurt your child’s jaw structure development. When breathing through the nose, a child’s tongue rests on the palate (roof of the mouth). This allows it to become a mold for the palate and upper jaw to form around. Conversely with mouth breathers the tongue rests behind the bottom teeth, which deprives the developing upper jaw of its tongue mold.

The general reason why a person breathes through the mouth is because breathing through the nose is uncomfortable or difficult. This difficulty, though, could arise for a number of reasons: allergy problems, for example, or enlarged tonsils or adenoids pressing against the nasal cavity and interfering with breathing. Abnormal tissue growth could also obstruct the tongue or lip during breathing.

Treatment for mouth breathing will depend on its particular cause. For example, problems with tonsils and adenoids and sinuses are often treated by an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) specialist. Cases where the mandible (upper jaw and palate) has developed too narrowly due to mouth breathing may require an orthodontist to apply a palatal expander, which gradually widens the jaw. The latter treatment could also influence the airway size, further making it easier to breathe through the nose.

The best time for many of these treatments is early in a child’s growth development. So to avoid long-term issues with facial structure and overall dental health, you should see your dentist as soon as possible if you suspect mouth breathing.

If you would like more information on issues related to your child’s dental development, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.




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